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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
. max foster, cnn, london. >> want to bring in richard quest from london, not to be confused with richard iii. richard, why is everybody fascinated about the story? like the twitter verse is blowing up over this thing. some people think, maybe he was unfairly painted as this vilen and hundreds and hundreds of years later they want to rehabilitate his image. >> and it is everywhere. just look, the newspapers, all have the story in the uk. bent spine, slashed skull and dna. everybody's got it. and you want to know why, because it's the thought of mystery. for half a millennium we wondered, not only what happened to him, although it was known he died at the battle of bosworth, but how did they die. where was he buried. he was he the evil king of shakespeare? remember, we all read this, richard iii, a horse, a horse, my kingdom, for a horse. it's everywhere. and it's that element of mystery that's now being uncovered. >> why do people care so much about this? he really was, like pretty evil dude killing people but -- >> no. >> a lot of people did that, right? that was part of the
in the lives of others, go to cnnheros.com. nominate a cnn hero. thanks for watching. tune in tomorrow morning for your bottom line. that and he my show at 9:30. newsroom international is next. >>> welcome to newsroom international. >> happy friday. >> this hour we're taking you around the world in 60 minutes. we begin of course in south africa. oscar pistorius getting bail. t stay right here, we'll be live from pretoria in just a minute. >>> and a snowstorm putting tens of millions of people in a deep freeze. we'll take you to one of the hardest hit states and tell you where the storm is headed next. first of all, though, a major development in the oscar pistorius murder case. the olympic track star no longer in jail. he's left the court already. >> so there are some conditions, how far. the magistrate said bail at $1 million, so that's about $112,000. he can't go back to his house. he has to hand over his passport as well as ghuns. and he's prohibited from drinking alcohol while out on bail. >> also has to report to police twice a week. let's go to restore i can't and nic robertson standing
of the union." i'm candy crowley in washington. head to cnn.com/sotu for analysis and extras. and if you missed any part of today's show, find us on itunes. search "state of the union." "fareed zakaria: gps" is next. >>> this is "gps," the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have a great show for you today and we begin with american politics. what is really happening? are the republicans on the defensive? will the automatic budget cuts happen? is there any chance of legislative deals? we have a great panel, paul krugman, mort zuckerman, arianna huffington, and ed conard. >>> then something special. an exclusive interview with the richest man in india, the second richest man in all of asia. mukesh ambani. why he's bullish on america. it was the first time television cameras were ever allowed in his extraordinary mansion in the sky. >>> then, everyone is worried about the arab spring. i talked to the leaders of five arab governments to get some answers. and a fascinating internal power struggle in iran and what it means. bu
? thank you so much for watching "state of the union." i'm candy crowley in washington. head to cnn.com/sotu. fareed zakaria is next for our viewers here in the united states. >>> this is "gps, the global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have two famous and fascinating guests for you today. first, the world's second wealthiest man, bill gates. despite the weak economy, despite the strife in molly, syria, else where, despite massacres and messed up weather, gates says he is optimistic about the future. he'll tell us why. >>> and vice president turned businessman/thinker/filmmaker environmental activist, al gore on american politics, gun control, climate change and much more. coming up. >>> also, did you have more money in your bank account this week than a major african nation? probably. i'll explain. >>> but, first, here's my take. the scenes of chaos and strife in egypt that you've been seeing during the second anniversary of the terrar square uprising. arab spring and for the old order. but let's remember, that
, the notion of americans checking the news on their phones or going to cnn or watching c-span. these things were cultivated in that period sauternes out pulitzer played a historically significant role and the fascinating life that made for great reading but the influence he yielded is with us today. the reason people don't remember pulitzer today as much is in some ways his accomplishment is so happenstance. we're so used to what it is. in the nineteenth century, printing was the internet. i can book a ticket now or everyday -- all commonplace things we don't think it's such a great deal and in some way i am not sure americans remember who morgan was or who rockefeller was or who carnegie was but we drive across a bridges made with steel, that is the carnegie gift, using cars powered by oil, all the world that rockefeller built and using a financial system built on morgan and consuming news built on a system developed and created by people like pulitzer. pulitzer was born in the 1840s and came to the united states as a mercenary soldier to fight in the vietnam-the civil war. they went to re
if you looked at cnn yesterday afternoon, the killing in syria, it came to an end. >> it did. >> yesterday on capitol hill, republicans and democrats hugged. the whole idea of an historic hold on the secretary of defense, they said, you know what? let's put this to the side because of this cruise ship debacle. i mean, mika, all of the things we worry about -- the national debt clock stopped. >> basically the world stopped. >> we don't have to worry. paul krugman's right. we don't have to worry anymore because cnn tells us that this cruise ship was the only story that mattered yesterday for 24 hours. >> that's right. >> and you know what? makes me feel pretty good about the state of the world. >> and i'm glad they're home. >> that nothing is happening to that degree that they can do that. i think that's very exciting for all of us. i'm very pleased. >> it's very good when the world stops to be told that. >> perspective it be reassuring. >> it's all relative. that's true. >> it's all relative. syria, come on. people are dying. middle east peace breaking up. that doesn't matter.
to the international space station under the soyuz program, and i saw that on cnn, and i figure that would be the way. if i can just find the money somehow, then i would be able to go to space. and it became an inspiration for me to build my company, and opposite i was able to do that, i looked at other possibilities, and i wanted to see if there is a way we can make this happen for everyone. i knew there will be probably million of other young girls who share this dream with me. and we looked at different options, and one was the export company which had just been formed, and i met with the founder, and he is my hero, actually, and he told me about his vision of the prize to inspire entrepreneurs to actually build space ships that would go to space. not government agencies but people in their garages. i thought that would be a really cool idea. you get entrepreneurs building spaceships and prove the government agencies they can do it better, cheaper, faster, and that's when entrepreneurship is about. that's how we became title sponsors of the prize, a $10 million prize for private companies to build
was the network's chief white house correspondent 2009 until 2012 and just last month, left to join cnn as the chief washington correspondent and anchor of an upcoming daily news show. his book, "the outpost: an untold story of american valor", is about a 2009 battle in afghanistan. one magazine described it as perhaps the best afghanistan but to date. please welcome to the savannah book festival, jake tapper. [applause] >> thank you so much. i know sergeant burchfield who is in the book and his family are here. anybody who is in the book over there, there she is, hello. he and his son and i believe everything is set. also, but he is a national guardsman. he was training afghan soldiers and gave his life trying to save an afghan soldier six years ago tomorrow. in any case, anybody who is here whose lives are chronicled in the book or lives of loved ones are chronicled in the book, it means so much when they do turn out much when they do turn out and come to visit us. please come over and introduce yourself after the event. i am not a likely person to have written the war book. i have co
solutions. on cnn, defense secretary panetta, secretary dempsey, and former labor secretary elaine chow. bob schieffer talking with nfl commissioner roger goodell. these are brought to you as a public service by the networks and c-span. beginning at noon with nbc's "meet the press." 1:00, this week. 2:00, fox news sunday. and finally at 4:00 p.m. eastern, face the nation from cbs. listen to them on c-span radio, 90.1 fm radio, nationwide on xm 119, on your smartphone or on- line to c-spanradio.org. >> john mccain's 2000 campaign when he ran for president is the most memorable campaign of any that i have ever covered or been around. we will never see it again. george w. bush had all of the face cards, the republican governors, the backing of all of the money. john mccain went and held 114 town meetings and stayed until every question was answered. you see the light bulb going on over these heads. we will never get a patient's bill of rights until my party is not owned by the insurance companies. there was this refreshing candor. he was totally open to the press. there was a sort of welcoming
heard both former c.i.a. director michael haden in an interview on cnn and a general say that it is now changed and say that it is now changed and that
" and a cnn contributor. after each one speaks we'll take questions from the audience. finally, please form all statements in the form of a question. thanks. >> thank you. it is a pleasure to be here tonight. it is the earlier i've been out of the office. what should a supporter of free markets and enterprise think of immigration? what should a good policy be? i think this answer -- the answer to this question is simple and straight forward. now, legal immigration, whether through a program or permanent migration it should be easier for people throughout the world, especially for workers. i think this conclusion is easy and simple to reach. i think it -- it doesn't matter what basis you approach it from. whether you like free markets because of toldtarian arguments. i think the answer is all the same. now, let's give you a setup. of all the markets in the world that has to do with the flows and goods enservice of the cross borders, labor is the most reing strictive of all of them. the labor market is one of the most important of them. free marketers know that deregulating, allowing more com
of years later you were watching on cnn another shooting that took place in upstate new york in bloomington. what did you see, and what was your reaction to that? >> guest: it was april 3rd, 2009, almost two years after the shooting that i had been involved in. and i learned a great deal during that two-year time about how the situation i was involved in came to be. the school policies and the mental health policies and gun policies, how this person was allowed to buy a gun and despite having a record that prevented them from doing so they had a mental it to the occasion. i hadn't seen other shootings. i couldn't watch them up until that point but just how i kind of naturally turn on the tv that morning and saw the tv break i couldn't turn away. i sat there and i watched the news unfold throughout the course of the day and i thought this is how the whole world saw me and yet we change nothing. yet there was no policy on non-policy and mental health policy and i kept hearing that. what gives, and finally the was the end of that day, kind of my tipping point i have to deliver i can to address
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)